InstructorKaren Whitman
DateJul 19, 2021 - Jul 21, 2021
TimeMonday-Wednesday, 9:00AM-4:00PM
PlaceWoodstock School of Art, Studios 3 and 4
Seat5/6
Price$360
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THE BLACK & WHITE LINOCUT: EXPLORING TEXTURE, VALUE, CONTRAST

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THE BLACK & WHITE LINOCUT: EXPLORING TEXTURE, VALUE, CONTRAST

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ABOUT THIS WORKSHOP

In this 3-day workshop, students will transfer their designs to a block, carve, and print, while making aesthetic judgments involving compositional principles of design, balance, value and form to create strong, impactful works of art. 

Block print is the oldest form of printmaking that is still being used today. Beginning one thousand years ago, block prints have made a visual record of civilizations from the Far East to the Americas. From the East we have come to appreciate great Ukiyo-e printmakers such as Katsushika Hokusai and Ando Hiroshige. In the West, most of the images were used for illustrations, reproductions, and maps in books and periodicals ranging from Renaissance bibles and religious books, adorned by great woodcut artists such as Albrecht Durer, to newspapers such as Harper’s Weekly, filled with amazing images, two page spreads, and political cartoons by the legendary Thomas Nast. By the end of the nineteenth century pioneering artists such as Paul Gauguin and Edward Munch explored new possibilities in block prints. In the twentieth century, when traditional printmaking was no longer needed for reproductive and commercial purposes, block prints fully became a fine art medium, adopted by such artists as Picasso, Kirchner, Kollwitz, Escher, and Feininger.

While linoleum had been used for flooring since the 1860s, its earliest known use as a printmaking medium was in Germany, around 1905, by members of the artist group known as Die Brucke (The Bridge) which included Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Max Pechstein, and Emil Nolde. Since then, its popularity has grown due its ease of carving, its durability, and strength.

Students of this workshop will learn design and composition considerations, how to adapt an image to be suitable for the medium, carving strategies and techniques, how to transfer a design to a block and print… and the value of patience and perseverance.

Suitable for all levels, no experience necessary! Ages 15 and up.

July 19–21, 2021; Monday–Wednesday, 9 AM–4 PM

$360 ($330 tuition + $30 lab fee)

SUPPLY LIST

To address COVID concerns and ensure the safety of all the WSA Board of Directors request all students, instructors and staff be fully vaccinated before coming to the school campus. All studio classes and workshops will have reduced number of students and maintain social distancing. Additionally, air purification systems will be installed in all of the studios, office and gallery.

In an effort to maintain our non-toxic environment, the Woodstock School of Art  does not permit the use of turpentine or mineral spirits in the painting studios.  Learn more.

Those with special needs and/or requests may email the registrar.

Please note that for workshops lasting all day there is a one-hour break from twelve noon to one PM. Students are invited to bring lunch and eat at the school or may go to any of the local dining establishments. The school does not provide lunch or refreshments.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Karen Whitman is a Woodstock, NY printmaker, specializing in linoleum block prints, which she prints herself on both antique and modern presses. She has a BFA in Printmaking from State University of New York at Buffalo and has also studied at The Art Students League in New York City. She has exhibited extensively throughout the country and has won numerous regional and national awards, including seven medals of honor. Whitman is a member of The Society of American Graphic Artists, and Allied Artists of America. The prints of Karen Whitman were featured in the December, 2002 issue of American Artist magazine and she is listed in Who’s Who in American Art.