InstructorKaren Whitman
DateAug 29, 2017 - Aug 31, 2017
TimeTuesday-Thursday, 9 AM-4 PM
Price$345
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The Black & White Linocut: Exploring Texture, Value, Contrast Workshop

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The Black & White Linocut: Exploring Texture, Value, Contrast Workshop

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linocut

ABOUT THIS WORKSHOP

This linocut workshop, for beginners to advanced students, explores the many ways drama and impact can be accomplished through effective combinations of blacks, whites and tones and the skillful use of a variety of tools. The student is encouraged to juxtapose contrasting or subtle textures and patterns as well as to consider a light source in achieving an impactful and artistic result.  Skills will be honed by learning various cross-hatchings, parallel lines, stippling, textures, fades, and the use of thin-to-thick lines as well as block preparation and printing. Simple and complex images can be equally expressive and beautiful.

Block print is the oldest form of printmaking that is still being used today. Beginning one thousand years ago, block prints have made a visual record of civilizations from the Far East to the Americas. From the East we have come to appreciate great Ukiyo-e printmakers such as Katsushika Hokusai and Ando Hiroshige. In the West, most of the images were used for illustrations, reproductions, and maps in books and periodicals ranging from Renaissance bibles and religious books, adorned by great woodcut artists such as Albrecht Durer, to newspapers such as Harper’s Weekly, filled with amazing images, two page spreads, and political cartoons by the legendary Thomas Nast. By the end of the nineteenth century pioneering artists such as Paul Gauguin and Edward Munch explored new possibilities in block prints. In the twentieth century, when traditional printmaking was no longer needed for reproductive and commercial purposes, block prints fully became a fine art medium, adopted by such artists as Picasso, Kirchner, Kollwitz, Escher, and Feininger.

While linoleum had been used for flooring since the 1860s, its earliest known use as a printmaking medium was in Germany, around 1905, by members of the artist group known as Die Brucke (The Bridge) which included Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Max Pechstein, and Emil Nolde. Since then, its popularity has grown due its ease of carving, its durability, and strength.

Suitable for all levels; no experience necessary!

 

In an effort to maintain our non-toxic environment, the Woodstock School of Art  does not permit the use of turpentine or mineral spirits. Additionally, please refrain from wearing perfume, cologne or scents of any kind. Learn more.

$345
August 29-31, Tuesday-Thursday, 9 AM-4 PM